Carolyn Cheasman – Mindfulness and Speech Therapy

I’m not sure how I haven’t come across this before – but here is a short talk by Carolyn Cheasman (who is herself a person who stutters) on mindfulness and its usefulness for Speech Therapists. Carolyn also runs excellent courses for people who stutter (as well as Speech Therapists) over at City Lit in London.

The zen of listening (to yourself)

“One of the main reasons we listen poorly is because our internal noise levels are so turbulent and obtrusive that they mark most of what others are saying. Only bits and pieces of their message survive the barrage of our mental interference.”

The above is from Rebecca Shafir’s ‘The Zen of Listening’ and it is just as true of how negative thoughts and beliefs about our stuttering can stop us from objectively experiencing moments of dysfluency. By learning to look past these thoughts and beliefs and understanding our stutter better we can make our peace with it and find ways to ease its impact on our lives.

Zen of Listening

Barry Guitar on Mindfulness and Stuttering

barry guitar

I came across a brief presentation by well-known specialist Barry Guitar (who I believe is himself a person who stutters) on mindfulness and stuttering. It ends with some personal reflections, which I thought were helpful:

  • Mindfulness meditation is best as a daily practice.
  • Meditation provides an experience of feeling time slow down. [It] enhances a sense of calmness.
  • [A mindful approach to stuttering can mean that you welcome opportunities] to stutter so that you can observe it and work with feelings and behaviours associated with it.