The zen of listening (to yourself)

“One of the main reasons we listen poorly is because our internal noise levels are so turbulent and obtrusive that they mark most of what others are saying. Only bits and pieces of their message survive the barrage of our mental interference.”

The above is from Rebecca Shafir’s ‘The Zen of Listening’ and it is just as true of how negative thoughts and beliefs about our stuttering can stop us from objectively experiencing moments of dysfluency. By learning to look past these thoughts and beliefs and understanding our stutter better we can make our peace with it and find ways to ease its impact on our lives.

Zen of Listening

Addressing Fear Through Meditation: Zen and Stuttering

Just read a nice little article by Stefan Bogdanov entitled ‘Addressing Fear through Meditation: Zen and Stuttering‘ (2009). Bogdanov makes some interesting points, for example warning against starting ‘mindfulness mediation in order to achieve fluency’. Rather than acting directly upon our speech, Bogdanov argues, it can instead help us better understand and manage our ‘fears, ideas and expectations’ around stuttering. 

meditate